578 stories
·
19 followers

Neighbours alley lined up for ‘pedestrian-friendly, safer’ design

1 Share

The alley between Broadway and Harvard Ave — aka, the Neighbours Alley (Image: CHS)

Part of the 2018 allocation of some $1.2 million in City Hall funding for neighborhood projects across Seattle will go to get the ball rolling on a project to make a surprising part of Capitol Hill “a more pedestrian-friendly, safer environment.”

In spring of 2010, CHS mused about an underutilized Capitol Hill asset — the neighborhood’s alleys:

Most of Seattle’s alleys are currently dark and spooky streets, left mainly to trash and rats. But in other places, alleys come to life and provide a uniquely pedestrian experience for locals and visitors alike.

Melbourne’s Laneways are a good example. Over the years some of these tiny streets have developed into tourist destinations of their own, with all kinds of creative store fronts, restaurants, and art pieces withdrawn from the traffic and congestion of the arterials.

A project being carried forward by Capitol Hill Housing which owns and operates the Broadway Crossing building alongside it could set the groundwork for a similar approach in the alley running through the block between Pine and Pike, midway between Broadway and Union.

The so-called “Neighbours alley” is currently used by patrons lining up on club nights to enter the dance venue and by service vehicles dealing with garbage and recycling.

We’ve asked for clarification on how much the alleyway project will be granted and will update when we hear back.

“Seattle’s small businesses are part of who we are as a City: innovative, dynamic, and unique. Supporting our neighborhood small businesses is key to making our City more vibrant, innovative, and affordable,” Mayor Jenny Durkan said in the announcement of this year’s neighborhood funding for marketing, promotional, and safety projects. “If Seattle is going to continue to be the City that invents the future, we must do all we can to support our small businesses.”

Earlier this month, Durkan announced the initial roster for her newly formed Seattle Small Business Advisory Council including a handful of familiar Capitol Hill business names.

We don’t have much additional information on the alleyway initiative but we’re told that CHH is heading it and the funding announced Monday will go to powering the design phase of the project.

Additionally, the city’s Only in Seattle program earmarks $87,000 in funding in a joint proposal including the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce and another $104,000 in grants for the Central Area. You can see the full roster of the $1.2 million allocation here.


297854_10150341619001351_8356073_nAppreciate CHS? Subscribe Today  Please consider becoming a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news. Help push us over the 800 mark and help us stay NO POP-UPS! You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment here using Square.

Already a subscriber? Please TELL A FRIEND to help us reach our goal.


Read the whole story
ridingsloth
7 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Project to replace Pike/Pine natural gas mains begins next week

1 Comment

The electrical grid. Our sewage system. The underpinnings of an old neighborhood facing an ongoing population spike need care and maintenance — and, sometimes, a full replacement. A Puget Sound Energy project to replace major swaths of 1980s-era main gas pipes beneath the core of Capitol Hill is set to begin next week.

“In an ongoing effort to deliver safe and reliable energy to our Seattle-area customers, Puget Sound Energy’s natural gas system maintenance program will soon be underway in your neighborhood,” a bulletin on the project sent to customers reads. “The work requires PSE to replace the existing, underground natural gas main, installed in the early 1980’s, with corrosion-resistant plastic main. We are committed to completing the work with as little inconvenience to you as possible.”

The work is scheduled to be undertaken in four phases starting Monday, February 12th near Cal Anderson and stretching into July along Pike and across 10th and 11th Ave.

Work hours on the project will be Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM with “some weekend work.” Expect signs and traffic control flaggers to “guide pedestrians and vehicles safely through the work zone” and for parking to be “impacted.” Some customers may also experience “a short interruption of natural gas service during this time.”

“Additional communications will be sent during the project to keep everyone updated,” PSE notes.

You can learn more at pse.com.

Read the whole story
ridingsloth
13 days ago
reply
Gonna be a meeeess
Share this story
Delete

Korean fried chicken joint Bonchon has First Hill plans

1 Comment

Such is life in the swiftly changing core of Seattle. We had no Korean fried chicken joints. Now we’re about to have two.

Despite the corporate parents insisting there are “no plans” to open in Seattle, CHS can report that efforts are just getting underway to build out a new, first-in-the-Pacific Northwest location of Korean chicken chain Bonchon at the corner of Broadway and James, across the street from the southwest corner of the Seattle University campus.


297854_10150341619001351_8356073_nAppreciate CHS? Subscribe Today  Please consider becoming a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news. Help push us over the 800 mark and help us stay NO POP-UPS! You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment here using Square.

Already a subscriber? Please TELL A FRIEND to help us reach our goal.


The restaurant is being planned to occupy the corner retail space of First Hill’s newly constructed Zig Apartments. The Zig project was iced for years after the economic downturn before being revived in early 2016. The corner of Broadway and James has housed tasty fast food before. Yasuko’s Teriyaki and El Mestizo called the 1906-built, two-story, 4-unit masonry apartment that stood there previously home. The teriyaki restaurant’s owner Yasuko Conner also owned the old building and sold to developers in 2011 for $3,339,000, according to county records.

The global Bonchon chain was born in South Korea in 2002 before expanding internationally a few years later with a start in New Jersey and New York. It now boasts more than 80 locations and has a robust franchising system in place. “‘Bonchon'” means ‘my hometown’ and is an homage to the company’s roots in Busan, South Korea,” the franchisee packet reads. “We are famous around the world for our signature fried chicken, which is double-fried with one of two secret sauces. Despite Bonchon’s growing presence around the world, our name ensures we never lose sight of our roots.”

There are more than 200 Bonchon restaurants in nine countries including both corporate and franchise owned locations, according to the company. “The Initial Franchise Fee to open a Bonchon store is $40,000, and the initial investment varies from $400,000 to $700,000 depending on numerous factors, such as restaurant size and location to name a few,” if you’re keeping track.

We’ve reached out to the company and what appears to be local ownership to learn more about plans and timeframe for the Broadway and James restaurant.

When it does debut, Seattle U kids will have to decide whether to walk north or south for their fried chicken fix. In December, Seattle’s Bok a Bok expanded from its White Center original to add a new location next to Neumo’s.

Read the whole story
ridingsloth
20 days ago
reply
MOAR FRIED CHICKENS
Share this story
Delete

Addo incubator pops up at 23rd/Madison with everything from Richard’s Burger to Japanese brunch

1 Comment

There’s no existing model for the wide range of culinary experiences Eric Rivera is cooking up at his private dining venue Addo in the former of Crush on 23rd and Madison. He’s making it up as he goes along, and a glance at Addo’s upcoming meal calendar reveals Rivera’s freewheeling, globetrotting approach to pop-up dining: a seven-course family-style seafood dinner ($65), a traditional Japanese brunch ($35), a gourmet homage to Dick’s Drive-In called the “Richard Burger” ($17, includes fries and special sauce). To accurately describe what Rivera is up to, one must resort to the terminology of the tech industry: It’s an incubator, a beta testing laboratory, a gastronomic version of Netflix.

“I’m always trying to work 60 to 90 days out, plugging in awesome ideas that I think will sell—and then some weird ones,” he says, “When I run out of ideas or get stuck with ‘writers block,’ that’s when I reach out to people to collaborate.”

Rivera has teamed up on pop-ups with nationally acclaimed chefs like Shota Nakajima and Grant Achatz. He also works with new talent through Addo’s incubator program, a 90-day test run that gives fledgling chefs an opportunity to ply their craft at the highest levels in which Rivera serves as a sounding board on feasibility, branding, and business models to help take their food concept to the next level. In addition, he offers intensive, small-group cooking classes on techniques like pickling and fermenting.

“It’s all about the confidence it gives them,” Rivera says, “I’ve worked with people all around the world at the highest levels of restaurants and one of the most important things is having that confidence in your own stuff. That’s what I’m trying to instill in people, and to give them a place where they can do it.”

Addo is currently putting the former home of Crush to use as a food and drink space again following the 2015 closure of the Jason Wilson restaurant.

By providing a central base of operations and reaching out to peers and upstarts for inspiration and cross-disciplinary collaboration, Rivera has created a space for world class food experimentation that changes daily. His command of kitchen logistics, garnered from working for such culinary institutions as Chicago’s Michelin-three-starred Alinea and the Pacific Northwest’s Huxley Wallace Collective, give him the confidence to go out on a limb and get playful with the ingredients. It’s not uncommon for him to prepare an entirely different menu every night of the week.

“If we’re gonna run salmon Wednesday through Sunday, it doesn’t mean I have to cook it all the same way. I can do anything to it! I can make a puree or a soup or even freeze-dry the damn thing! I can order one thing and manipulate it 20 different ways. Or not! I can just put salt, pepper, and lemon on it!”

When asked about near-future plans Rivera enthusiastically spins off a half-dozen projects: a series of specialized menus for allergies and aversions (keto, gluten-free, vegan) an upcoming Planned Parenthood benefit dinner, a local breadmaker he’s excited about, and Lechoncito, a Puerto Rican restaurant he hopes to plant on Capitol Hill sometime this year with a menu he’s already workshopped in pop-up form through Addo. The incubator/beta lab/restaurant he has built is spinning off in multiple directions and that’s how Rivera likes it.

“It’s just a matter of catching the attention of the diner. Everyone’s so focused on what‘s new, so I’m bringing that. People come and they know it’s gonna be different. It puts pressure on me to keep it new and fun and exciting.”

Addo does its thing at 2319 E Madison. Dinners are booked up through April but there are plenty of upcoming benefits and pop-ups on the schedule. You can learn more at ericriveracooks.com/addo.

Read the whole story
ridingsloth
22 days ago
reply
As mentioned by D recently
Share this story
Delete

Capitol Hill Pets | Who’s that guy with Gretel on 15th Ave E?

1 Comment


Adam and Gretel were taking an early morning, drizzly stroll along 15th Ave E near QFC when we caught up with them. Gretel is a 10-year-old Great Dane and has been with Adam since she was a puppy. Getting on in age for such a large dog, the walks are slow but with many friends to greet along the way. In fact, Adam tells us that Gretel is so well known in the area, that Adam often goes unrecognized if he’s walking alone. Say hi to gentle Gretel if you see her in the neighborhood, Adam’s pretty nice too.

We ask photographer Alex Garland to follow marchers in the rain and do crazy things like trying to make yet another picture of yet another huge apartment building look interesting. We thought we’d ask him to do something a little more fun. Capitol Hill Pets is a semi-regular look at our furry, fuzzy, feathered, and finned friends found out and about on Capitol Hill.

Read the whole story
ridingsloth
25 days ago
reply
<3
Share this story
Delete

Machine House taproom will be E Jefferson neighborhood pub with cask ales and football on the telly

1 Share

(Image: Machine House)

If you want to do it right — create your own cask ales, “served through beer engines and at cellar temperature” — you’re going to have to do it yourself. Georgetown-born Machine House Brewery is building a cozy tap room and soccer pub to showcase its English-style beers amid the growing food and drink scene along E Jefferson because it’s a bloody shame to waste great beer.

“Very few pubs can serve it properly,” Machine House co-founder Bill Arnott tells CHS. “We’ve found we need to control the experience. We need bartenders who can explain and present it.”

“It’s this kind of thing that doesn’t have the best reputation if you get it wrong. When it’s done right it’s completely exceptional.”

Arnott and co-founder Alex Brenner hope to open the new Machine House taproom in the 1300-block of Jefferson by summer — hopefully in time for the World Cup. Compared to the massive and spartan factory setting of the Machine House brewery in Georgetown, the 14th and Jeff pub will be a cozy affair at just 1,000 square feet. The plan is selection of handles pulling Machine House ales, a handle or two for guest taps, screens for English Premier League football and, we assume, the rest of the world’s soccer offerings, plus, in a first for Machine House, food. Details on the English pub offerings are still being worked out.

Arnott said the goal is to expand Machine House’s presence in the city while maintaining control over presentation and creating a neighborhood hangout in an area of the city he used to call home — “before I was priced out.” The English-style beer pub will neighbor the “pacifiquenorthwest”-flavored francophiles at L’Oursin and nearby Vietnamese steakhouse Seven Beef. If you don’t like the game selection at Machine House, you can walk over to check out Paul Pogba at Cafe Presse or Mesut Ozil at German-styled beer hall Rhein Haus. Meanwhile, Seattle University’s Championship Field soccer pitch is right across the street.

Machine House, Arnott said, has been brewing in Georgetown since 2013 and was born out of his nostalgia for the beer of his homeland. He met Brenner playing soccer and the two struck up a friendship over beer as a business. “We didn’t know what we were doing,” he says of the early days of planning for Machine House. “We were very naive.”

Today, the beers are a unique part of the city’s brewing scene and, while Machine House won’t add to the Hill-brewed offerings like Optimism, Outer Planet, Redhook, and Elysian, it clearly is doing something right.

“In a country where beer is expected to be cold and fizzy,” Arnott said, “we’ve been here for five years.”

Machine House is planned to open by summer at 1315 E Jefferson. You can learn more at machinehousebrewery.com.


297854_10150341619001351_8356073_nAppreciate CHS? Subscribe Today  Please consider becoming a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news. Help push us over the 800 mark and help us stay NO POP-UPS! Already a subscriber? Please TELL A FRIEND to help us reach our goal. Learn more


Read the whole story
ridingsloth
39 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories