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Lumbersexual axe-tossing bar Blade and Timber coming to Broadway

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(Image: Blade and Timber)

Finally, Capitol Hill’s lumbersexuals will have a hangout to call their own.

Blade and Timber, the national chain of… checks notes… axe-throwing bars is coming to Broadway.

The Missouri-headquartered company has filed for permits for the ground level retail space at 206 Broadway E that has been empty since the Castle “sex megastore” chain moved its Capitol Hill location to Pike/Pine in 2014.

The first Blade and Timber opened in Kansas City in 2017. The company has plans for rapid expansion with a push to open a dozen more locations this year including a new bar planned for Portland on Vancouver Ave. The business operates like a bowling alley — you can book a private lane for $120 for 90 minutes or share a lane for $20. Given you’ll be throwing sharpened axes together while most likely consuming alcohol, choose your lane partners wisely. If something goes wrong, fortunately the new use for Charlie’s right across the street is ready to help.

The bar chain’s arrival on Broadway is part of a big investment in the commercial building just a block from Capitol Hill Station.

CHS reported here earlier this year on real estate investor Dhruv Agarwal’s plans to overhaul the building in anticipation of even greater growth in activity around the light rail facility. “It’s an incredible part of the city with the new light rail station opening,” Agarwal told CHS in January. “As the light rail network expands and traffic gets worse in Seattle, the Capitol Hill Station is going to be a hub for entertainment and neighborhood shopping.”

Above the coming axe tossing bar, the vegan rockers at the Highline remain ensconced in the bar’s longtime second story home. Agarwal, meanwhile, is moving forward with another part of his project creating new office space behind the vegan bar and night spot.

Blade and Timber is planned to open at 206 Broadway E. You can learn more at bladeandtimber.com.


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ridingsloth
17 days ago
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Bwahaha
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From Sun to Sol: New owner lined up for Capitol Hill’s Sun Liquor Lounge

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(Image: Sun Liquor)

Sun Liquor Lounge, the Capitol Hill bar that went on sale for just under $200,000 earlier this year, might have found a new owner in Andre Sayre, a 30-year-old tech worker taking a break to find a new avenue in life.

“I enjoy the community aspect of a little place that everyone knows and loves,” he tells CHS about the planned purchase of the bar. “I wanted to do what I can to keep it around.”

There aren’t a lot of changes planned for the Summit Ave watering hole, the last vestige of Sun Liquor’s presence on Capitol Hill. Not everything from the bar was included in the deal. When the sales goes through, the old space will have a new name — Sol Liquor.

CHS reported this spring about owner Michael Klebeck’s plan to sell the lounge following the 2017 exit of Sun Liquor’s E Pike microdistillery from Capitol Hill as logistics became too much to handle in the densely packed neighborhood. Klebeck founded Top Pot Doughnuts on Summit with his brother Mark in 2002.

Today, Sayre is well into the process of acquiring the bar. He has been living on Capitol Hill just three blocks away from Sun Liquor Lounge for nearly six years now, and before Seattle, he worked in the restaurant and food industry in Santa Barbara, California. After moving here, Sayre worked at Microsoft and Amazon while bartending on the side for places like MoPOP and Benaroya Hall.

“It’s a great place for someone who just wants a simple, good craft cocktail,” Sayre said. “Nothing pretentious. Nothing gimmicky. Just fresh ingredients, a place to chat with friends, take somebody on a date”

The deal remains tentative and nothing has been finalized while elements like a liquor license transfer need to be worked out. He hopes to have a decision in less than a month. Here’s hoping it goes smoothly for him. CHS has tracked a few recent transactions involving liquor license assumptions that have dragged on including one off again, on again deal that has been in the works for months.

If the deal goes through, and he does acquire the bar, Sayre added that he intends to change as little as possible.

“If it ends up going through, I don’t plan to change a thing except two letters of the name. I’d love to keep all the same people, same type of drinks, same ambiance,” Sayre said. “It ain’t broke so I’m not going to fix it.”


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ridingsloth
33 days ago
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Tech worker who lives nearby bought it? Dammit! 😆
ojiikun
33 days ago
hah! a best friend of mine dated them a few years back. had a few dinner parties they attended.
ridingsloth
33 days ago
Hah!
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Seven Beef Re-Opens as Central Smoke and More Seattle Food News You Can Use: July 13, 2018 Edition

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by Stranger Things To Do Staff

The Central District’s Seven Beef, from the owners of Ba Bar and Monsoon, has re-opened as Central Smoke, a restaurant with a focus on smoked meats and smoke-infused cocktails with Asian flavors.
The Central District’s Seven Beef, from the owners of Ba Bar and Monsoon, has re-opened as Central Smoke, a restaurant with a focus on smoked meats and smoke-infused cocktails with Asian flavors. Central Smoke

It's a big week for food news in Seattle, as Angela Stowell becomes CEO of FareStart and Renee Erickson's restaurant group acquires three new brands from restaurateur Josh Henderson. Plus, learn about a new doughnut stand named after a Tom Waits song and where you can find Mexican baked goods, brioche doughnuts, and free plant-based frozen treats this weekend. For more delicious things to eat and drink, read our guide to celebrating Bastille Day in Seattle, check out our list of where to go for National French Fry Day, and visit our complete food and drink calendar.

OPENINGS
Asadero Sinaloa
According to a press release, the Mexican steakhouse Asadero, which also has a location in Ballard, has opened a new location in Kent. The restaurant previously resided in a smaller location in Kent but has moved to a new space to accommodate more business. The new location retains the previous menu and also adds a few new dishes, including bone marrow gorditas and prime carnitas con chile. Chef/owner David Orozco will also open another location, Asadero St. Helena, in Tacoma's Stadium District later this year, with more details to come in the fall.
Kent

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ridingsloth
36 days ago
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Uuuuummmmm...
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You can cowork with Capitol Hill’s new Consulate of Mexico at the Harvard Exit

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Monday, the Consulate of Mexico in Seattle opened for its first day of official diplomatic business in the overhauled Harvard Exit.

You can make the old theater your office, too:

The Harvard Exit building (807 E. Roy St) has Class A office space in the heart of Capitol Hill. Offices and dedicated workstations come fully furnished with desk, chair, three drawer cabinet, and desk lamp. The coworking space contains a conference room, kitchenette, bathrooms, shower, shared copier/printer/scanner, and WiFi. You’ll just need to bring your laptop and files.  You’ll have access to your office/workstation 24/7. Dedicated workstations are $600 p/month. Private offices range from $1,300 – $2,100 p/month. Move in on August 1.

If you’re interested, email info@harvardexit.com.

 

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ridingsloth
38 days ago
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Hah, well it'd be convenient 😆
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Pikes/Pines | The great Capitol Hill eastern cottontail mystery of twenty eighteen

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Has anyone else noticed the sudden appearance of rabbits on the Hill? Growing up in Seattle, I can’t recall many rabbits sightings. There were a few at Discovery Park, and there was the infamous colony in a rocky warren in Lower Woodland. Other sizable green spaces have rabbits as well, but it always seemed likely that the Hill and the rest of central Seattle wasn’t suitable. Turns out I was wrong.

Feral, domesticated rabbits are not unusual in cities overall. Often people assume they are easy pets, and disown them upon discovering otherwise. They hop about for awhile and I assume, are dispatched by cars or coyotes. But the bunnies we’re seeing aren’t domesticated, they’re eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), and they’re suddenly everywhere. The real question is why?

Eastern cottontails were first introduced to Washington in the 1930s as a game animal. Western Washington lacked a native lagomorph (the rabbit, hare, and pika family) at low elevation before this. Back then, if you wanted to see a rabbit, you’d have had to travel to Eastern Washington for one of several species or into the mountains to see snowshoe hares.

There may not be an absolute answer as to why the Hill (and the rest of urban Western Washington) seems to have an influx of eastern cottontails. However, we have clue in their biology. Have you ever heard the phrase, “breeding like rabbits?” Rabbits are truly prolific.

The breeding season for a cottontail is from around February to September. Female cottontails are polyestrus, which means they can have multiple litters in a year, in fact, up to seven ( but averaging more like three or four). In said litters, there can be close to twelve kits, though the average is more like five. So, even a moderately fertile mother could have 20 kits in a year. Adding to the mix is the fact that rabbits are reproductively mature after a couple months. Nearly 25% of the young each year are brought forth by juveniles only a few months old, (only a small percentage of them jump right into it though). This adds up quickly.

Knowing that this is a species capable of fast reproduction, I feel like the answer to this riddle isn’t really that rabbits were never here. Maybe they weren’t around in large numbers, and maybe they weren’t on the Hill much or at all. I do doubt they’ve suddenly appeared out of nowhere. I know there’s long been a population between Husky Stadium and the Center for Urban Horticulture at UW. It wouldn’t be that hard for a few rabbits to steal across the Montlake Bridge at night.

Easter Bunny Sighting

Being reproductively capable is advantageous when you live off food sources that are ephemeral. There’s always greens for a rabbit in the Pacific Northwest, but just possibly, this spring was a particularly good season and the rabbits responded. Despite what Cliff Mass says, I don’t think predators are slacking on their jobs either; (on a side note, a friend who is a falconer and regularly hunts rabbits, confirmed that she’s seen a lot more around Western Washington in the past year). Populations ebb and flow, particularly those of small mammals. This may have just been an expansion year. I’ll be curious to see what happens in future years.

What I do know is that the cottontails — being herbivorous, and being introduced — aren’t always welcome visitors. People are protective of their gardens, and for good reason. I always refer to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s, Living with Wildlife website when conflicts occur, because typically there’s plenty to do before lethal action (that being said, introduced herbivores are pretty hard on native flora). And, if you are feeling like rabbits might be a new urban foraging menu item, do yourself a favor and look up tularemia. It just might not be worth it!


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ridingsloth
40 days ago
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People are noticing the buns
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Introducing Black Heron Lounge, the Newly Opened Barrel-Aged and Sour Ale Taproom from Fremont Brewing

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The brewery opened a new taproom quietly, without a fuss, and its offerings range in flavor. by Lester Black

A taproom right in the action.
A taproom right in the action. LB

Here’s a surprise summer gift for sour beer fans: Fremont Brewing just opened a new taproom dedicated exclusively to barrel-aged and sour ales. Dubbed the Black Heron Lounge, this new beer program and weekend-only taproom sits behind a roll-up garage door in the back corner of the brewery’s downtown Fremont location.

Fremont Brewing’s expansion into the world of sour ales—a broad style of beer that was perfected by the Belgians and subsequently revered by a large swathe of American craft beer drinkers—is another milestone in the brewery’s nine-year existence. Matt Lincecum and Sarah Nelson have grown their brewery from a tiny tasting room to a regional powerhouse with one of Seattle’s busiest beer gardens and a brewing production that occupies an entire city block of Ballard.

Black Heron Lounge dovetails nicely with Fremont Brewing’s history. Just like at the brewery’s original 2009 taproom, guests at Black Heron Lounge drink in close company with the actual brewing equipment and wooden barrels of fermenting beer. At the end of the weekend the bartenders tear down the bar and move the picnic tables, turning the space back into an active brewery.

The newest addition to Fremont Brewing’s beer empire was unveiled earlier this month without a grand opening or any fuss at all; they simply rolled up the garage door to reveal a production floor arranged with heavy picnic tables, a portable bar, and a wall of booth seating. The tucked-away taproom was hardly noticed by the weekend crowd fighting for seating at the nearby beer garden; I encountered only a handful of people drinking in the new space on both of my visits.

Mmmm, sour beer.
Mmmm, beer. LB

I started with the House Saison, a beer that should be the raison d’etre of a Belgian sour program. It was light on aroma, but had pleasant lemon and floral qualities. The Bier De Garde, a French sister style to the Belgian saison, was refreshingly carbonated with a light grainy character. Fruited sour ales can be dynamic beers with a deep range of flavor, but the Raspberry Silence was underwhelming; it felt one dimensional and jammy, like a simple glass of sparkling raspberry juice.

The Foeder Wine, named after the giant oak casks that it was aged in, had the burn of rubbing alcohol and an off flavor like bad white wine. Steer clear of this one at all costs.

The best beer on the menu was easily the Hazy Brett IPA, which combines an IPA’s hoppy aromas with the wild character of Brettanomyces yeast. It tasted like funky lemon and ripe fruit with a wonderfully balanced bitterness.

Will these beers usher in another formidable brand from Fremont Brewing? Go taste them and decide for yourself.

Black Heron Lounge is open from 3 to 9 p.m. on Fridays, and 1 to 9 p.m. on Saturdays.

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ridingsloth
51 days ago
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Relevant to some of you I bet!
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