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With no Seattle protest spike apparent, King County applies for Phase 2 of lifting COVID-19 restrictions

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With no sign so far of a potential spike from weeks of large crowds and protests, Seattle and the state’s largest county are ready to advance to Washington’s next phase of COVID-19 restrictions.

ALERT: Results are in from UW Medicine and out of 3,000 tests fewer than 1% were positive.  To our knowledge and based on volunteered information, there is no evidence so far of people testing positive for COVID-19 from attending protests in Seattle — a message added last week to the city’s new testing registration site

“Early data showed that there were no positive tests from the high number of asymptomatic people who came in for a test after participating in a demonstration,” a statement reads from the city’s Emergency Operations Center to CHS about Seattle officials relaxing their stance on protest concerns. “After Seattle urged all protesters to get tested for the coronavirus at expanded facilities, fewer than 1% are coming back positive,” Crosscut reported Tuesday.

King County has continued to add about 43 new positive cases per day in June — about 70% of its daily totals in May — even as testing has jumped to near 2,000 per day thanks to increased options and new clinics in Seattle. About one person still dies of COVID-19 every day in the county. To date, officials say 574 people have died here during the outbreak. Washington, meanwhile, reports 1,221 deaths across the state through Sunday.

So far, so good. But keep wearing your masks. The positive case trend has helped King County pull the trigger on applying for Phase 2 and the further lifting of restrictions that will add long-awaited components including small group sports practices and open the way for a few friends of family members to get together without feeling like scofflaws.

“The state is expected to process the application this week, and King County could move to Phase 2 as early as Friday,” the announcement reads.

Phase 2 will mean restaurants and bars can operate with “indoor customer occupancy” at 50% and outdoor dining also at 50% of capacity. You still won’t be able to eat or drink at the bar rail. In-store retail is locked at 30% capacity until the next phase. Gyms can reopen — though Capitol Hill will be down at least one as 10th Ave’s Mode of Fitness announced “the challenges brought by COVID 19″ including “the high number of canceled memberships” have “proved to be insurmountable.”

In-home domestic services will be officially allowed. And “accountants, architects, attorneys, engineers, financial advisors, information technologists, insurance agents, tax preparers, and other office-based occupations that are typically serving a client base” can start keeping office hours again — if they want to.

The biggest win, really, is the ultimate category of social distancing — you miss your friends and loved ones. “Individuals may gather with five or fewer people from outside their household per week,” the guidelines for Phase 2 read.

Amateur and youth sports activities will still be limited to five participants or less while Phase 2 allows the pros to take the field — without fans. More on Phase 2’s components can be found at the end of this post. UPDATE: As with many of the lifted restrictions, how the sports activities move forward will also be highly gated by local governments and organizations. Seattle Parks, for example, has said it won’t be opening its fields for scheduling until July.

The move comes just under two weeks after the county began an interim Phase 1.5 as health officials opted for a slower advancement on reopening in King County.

CHS reported here on the county’s progress on the key measures being considered by the state in approving new phases of reopening including infection rate, hospitalization trends, and testing resources. Earlier this month, Seattle announced a new free testing initiative that has added two mobile clinics — one to the north off Aurora and one in SoDo — as well as expanded recommendations for who should seek a test that includes anyone feeling even mild symptoms or who has had even a brief exposure to someone who is sick or tested positive.

The county’s most recently updated report on its performance against the measures dated June 8th is below.

PHASE 2 GUIDELINES via kingcounty.gov

Card Rooms

Activities allowed: All card rooms or similar activities.

Limitations: All card rooms are subject to Phase 2 guidance which generally restricts the card room designated area to the lesser of 25% capacity or 50 individuals. The restaurants or taverns area of the facility is required to follow the Phase 2 guidance, which restricts capacity to 50% and prohibits bar service. Games are also limited to 25% occupancy per table. Limitations on capacity does not include staff.

Construction

Activities allowed: All construction, including new work and where social distancing may not be maintained.

Limitations: All construction activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance.

Domestic Services

Activities allowed: Any worker (hourly, salaried, independent contractor, full-time, part-time, or temporary) who is paid by one or more employer and provides domestic services to an individual or household in/about a private home as a nanny, house cleaner, cook, private chef, or household manager.

Limitations: All domestic services are subject to Phase 2 guidance.

Drive-in theaters

Activities allowed: All drive-in theaters.

Limitations: All drive-in theaters are subject to Phase 2 guidance.

Fitness

Activities allowed: Staffed indoor fitness studios and facilities, including but not limited to gymnastics, weight and resistance training, martial arts, yoga, and similar instructor-led fitness services, as well as staffed indoor tennis facilities.

Limitations: All fitness activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance which generally limits to groups of five participants or less.

Higher Education

Activities allowed: All non-lecture based higher education and workforce training, including where social distancing may not be maintained.

Limitations: All higher education activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance.

In-store retail

Limitations: All retail activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance which restricts customer occupancy to 30% of a building’s occupancy or lower as determined by the fire code.

Library services

Activities allowed: All public libraries, public library systems, institutional and governmental libraries, and libraries at institutions of higher education.

Limitations: All library activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance which limits services to mail or curbside pick-up and libraries remain otherwise closed to the public.

Manufacturing operations

Limitations: All manufacturing activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance.

Outdoor recreation

Activities allowed: Staffed outdoor tennis facilities; guided ATV, paddle sports, and horseback riding; go-cart tracks, ORV/motocross facilities, and participant only motorsports; gondolas; zoos and aquariums; guided fishing, and all other similar activities.

Limitations: All outdoor recreation activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance and are generally limited to groups of five participants or less, in some instances up to 12 individuals or three households are permitted.

Personal services

Activities allowed: All personal services including Cosmetologists, Hairstylists, Barbers, Estheticians, Master Estheticians, Manicurists, Nail Salon Workers, Electrologists, Permanent Makeup Artists, Tattoo Artists, Cosmetology Schools and Esthetics Schools.

Limitations: All personal services are subject to Phase 2 guidance which restricts customer occupancy to 50% with the exception of one to one services in an enclosed room.

Pet grooming

Activities allowed: All pet grooming services including any location provided by an individual, or at a retail, veterinary, or other facility.

Limitations: All pet grooming services are subject to Phase 2 guidance which restricts client occupancy to 50%.

Professional photography

Limitations: All professional photography services are subject to Phase 2 guidance which restricts services to appointment only and for one client (and family member, if client is a minor) at any given time. Group sessions are not allowed unless the group consists of immediate family only.

Professional services

Activities allowed: Accountants, architects, attorneys, engineers, financial advisors, information technologists, insurance agents, tax preparers, and other office-based occupations that are typically serving a client base.

Limitations: All professional services are subject to Phase 2 guidance which restricts guest occupancy to 50% of a building’s occupancy with the exception of one to one service in a fully enclosed room.

Real estate (residential and commercial)

Activities allowed: All real estate brokers, firms, independent contractors and industry partners.

Limitations: All real estate activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance which generally restricts out of office activities to appointment only and with no more than three people; office activities require reservations for in-person customer services and guest occupancy is limited to 50% of a building’s occupancy.

Religious and faith organizations

Activities allowed: All religious and faith-based organizations may operate services including worship services; religious study classes; religious ceremonies; religious holiday celebrations, weddings, and funerals.

Limitations: All religious and faith based activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance which generally restricts indoor services to the lesser of 25% capacity or 50 individuals and in-home services/counseling is restricted to no more than five individuals. Outdoor services are permitted for up to 100 individuals. Limitations on capacity does not include an organization’s staff, but does include volunteers.

Restaurants and taverns

Limitations: All restaurant and tavern operations are subject to Phase 2 guidance which prohibits any bar seating and restricts indoor customer occupancy to 50% of a building’s occupancy or lower as determined by the fire code. Outdoor dining is allowed at 50% of capacity and does not count toward the building occupancy limit; additional outdoor seating will be allowed provided it follows Public Health – Seattle & King County’s best practices and a restaurant secures any municipal permit that may be required.

Social and recreational gatherings

Limitations: Individuals may gather with five or fewer people from outside their household per week.

Sporting activities

Activities allowed: Golf; professional sporting activities indoor and outdoor; outdoor youth team sports and outdoor adult recreational team sports, excluding school-connected or administered team sports and junior hockey.

Limitations: All sporting activities are subject to Phase 2 guidance (golf and other sporting activities). Non-professional sporting activities are generally limited to groups of five participants or less; for team sports that can mean limiting to groups of five in separate parts of the field if separated by a buffer zone. Professional sporting activities may generally operate, including up to 50 people for back office operations, for full team practices and spectator-less games and competitions.


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ridingsloth
21 days ago
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A Message to the City from Ken Jennings

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What we're doing "might save hundreds of thousands of lives. It might save millions of lives. This could be our Greatest Generation thing." by The Stranger
Ken Jennings says what were all doing might save hundreds of thousands of lives. It might save millions of lives. This could be our Greatest Generation thing.
What we're all doing "might save hundreds of thousands of lives. It might save millions of lives. This could be our Greatest Generation thing." Courtesy of Ken Jennings

Good morning. It's Friday, March 27, and today's message comes from the greatest Jeopardy contestant of all time, Ken Jennings.

"Things have been turned upside down so quickly and are changing so rapidly that it's hard to process. It's hard to know how to act. It's unnerving. Nothing like this has happened in living memory," he says.

"It seems to me like we're trying out the biggest-ever version of the trolley problem from philosophy. This is a classic ethical dilemma that revolves around a switch operator on a trolley line having to decide, in a split second, whether the trolley should go down one track or another, and therefore mow down different groups of people..."

"But we've never seen a trolley problem quite like this, where we as a city, and even more broadly as a culture, have just all decided seemingly automatically all the things that keep us sane, all the most beloved social and economic institutions—whether that's your kid's school or the neighborhood bar or the S&P 500—we're willing to mow down the whole thing just to save the other people on the track, because they are the most vulnerable among us."

He adds, "That's just remarkable to me. That even with the huge absence of national leadership right now, that Seattle and the country and the world have done this. It might save hundreds of thousands of lives. It might save millions of lives. This could be our Greatest Generation thing... our moon project."

He also thanks people who cant stay home like sanitation workers, postal workers, grocery workers: Youre on the front line of this, you are the real greatest of our time.
He also gives a shout-out to people who can't stay home, like sanitation, postal, and grocery workers: "You're on the front line of this, you are the real greatest of our time." Courtesy of Ken Jennings

According to his bio:

Ken Jennings was born in 1974 just outside Seattle, Washington, but grew up overseas. His family spent fifteen years in Korea and Singapore, where his father worked as an attorney. His only lifeline to American pop culture during those years was TV on the Armed Forces Network, where he watched Jeopardy! religiously after school every afternoon.

Jennings won the Greatest of All Time trophy in January, after a Final Jeopardy clue about who has the most speeches of any non-title character in a Shakespeare tragedy.

"The tournament was the highest ranked television event on prime time television apart from N.F.L. playoff games," the New York Times pointed out—more than twice the viewership of the series premiere of The Bachelor. (It must be recorded that Stranger superfan Nathalie Graham had predicted Ken's victory.)

Ken is in the new show Master Minds, premiering on the Game Show Network on April 6. "This outfit is unrelated to the show, it's my new quarantine look," he joked on Twitter.

This outfit is unrelated to the show, its my new quarantine look, he joked on Twitter.
"It's my new quarantine look." Game Show Network

Ken is also the author of many books, including his Junior Genius Guides, in which he guides young readers "through his favorite subjects, from maps to mythology, planetoids to presidents." If you would like Ken's thoughts beamed into your head twice a week, you should listen to his podcast with John Roderick, Omnibus. If you're more of a board game person, did you know he has a board game?

"Also I just want to take a second to thank those of you who didn't stay home today because you couldn't," Ken says in his Message to the City this morning. "Those of you who went out as sanitation workers collecting trash or or delivering mail, or delivering food, or stocking grocery shelves—you're on the front line of this, you are the real greatest of our time, and we're thinking about you and we appreciate you."

To everyone else: "Even though we feel isolated right now, this is a great cause, it's worth doing, and it's worth doing right."

Thank you so much for your message, Ken.

Thank you for helping us make sense of this.

Have a good day in quarantine, everyone.


* *

Previously in this series:



Lynn Sheltons Message to the City on March 25th.
Lynn Shelton's Message to the City on March 25th.

Timothy White Eagles message to the city on March 24.
Timothy White Eagle's message to the city on March 24.

Cookie Coutures message to the city on March 23.
Cookie Couture's message to the city on March 23.

Sarah Rudinoffs message to the city on March 22.
Sarah Rudinoff's message to the city on March 22.

John Osebolds message to the city on March 21.
John Osebold's message to the city on March 21.


Ben Gibbards message to the city on March 21.
Ben Gibbard's message to the city on March 20.

Nathan Chans message to the city on March 19.
Nathan Chan's message to the city on March 19.

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ridingsloth
102 days ago
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Channeling the vibe of loud and lively Osaka, Shota Nakajima’s Taku now open on Capitol Hill

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Shota Nakajima at work at Taku

Through his years running the award-worthy kitchen at 15th and Pine’s Adana and into the scary current times around Capitol Hill’s food and drink economy during the response to COVID-19, chef Shota Nakajima says he knows survival in the business isn’t really about the dishes and the booze. It’s about the vibe.

“Let’s do simple,” Nakajima says of his new addition to the neighborhood’s scene — Taku is now open on E Pike.

In this time of face masks and travel bans, it’s a journey.

“I want it to be really Japanese,” Nakajima said of the loud and so far surprisingly busy “casual spot for quick-serve cocktails” and breaded and fried kushikatsu.

Taku, Nakajima says, is his take on the glories of a busy Osaka bar — loud and obnoxious and full of good drink.

His goal is to have a drink in your hand in minutes. You enter the bar, grab a piece of paper, scribble out your order, and stay alert.

Still the youngest chef/owner on the Hill, Nakajima’s second venue has been a long time coming. CHS first wrote about the project’s early plans in December of 2018.

His tenure in the neighborhood began in 2015 with his namesake Naka restaurant and a focus on kaiseki and its seasonally focused, multi-course meals. He rebooted the concept to become Adana in early 2017 and make his food more accessible and more affordable.

Taku, the small, tightly packed bar, debuts a year and a half later in the giant mixed-use Pike Motorworks development on an E Pike that is much changed and in an environment that is going to be rough for every bar and restaurant. Nakajima says he prefers to stay positive — his Adana offered $2 Coronas the other night.

The new joint is a busy space with or without customers. With neon design by Electric Coffin and Shogo Ota of Tireman Studios, Taku started with Nakajima’s sketches and ended up a space they hope echoes with Osaka alleyways and Shinsekai district food stalls. There’s a long counter with room for 30 non socially distanced patrons plus a communal table. Taku also indulges in the Capitol Hill takeout window trend. You’ll also find a PIke/Pine bonus connecting to the building’s quasi-public inner plaza: Adam Heimstadt of Unicorn Seattle is reportedly constructing a custom unicorn door for the entrance.

Inside Taku, you’ll find simple draft cocktails and booze slushies, plus wine, sake and bottled Japanese beer, and a Toki highball machine. The breaded and fried goodness on the food menu ranges from $2 to $4 a pop for kushikatsu including shishito pepper, Japanese little smokie, lotus root, large shrimp, brie cheese, beef shortrib, veggies, mochi, “and more.”

Taku is “the kind of place I want to go to after I get off work” where he’ll finally be able to find a good bowl of rice after a night out in Pike/Pine — that’s the line Nakajima has been using when talking about the bar. It’s true that the busy young entrepreneur is sometimes not working. He said he is happy to mostly leave Taku in the hands of his right hand chef, Chris Hoey. You’ll find Nakajima still hard at work in the kitchen at Adana but, at Taku, he’ll finally get to enjoy his “rice on the Hill.”

He’s looking forward to that. He’s also interested in seeing what happens when he introduces the loud Osaka vibe in a place Kyoto-quiet like Seattle.

“When your order comes up, they’re gonna call your name,” Nakajima warns. “Better not be in the bathroom.”

Taku is located at 706 E Pike and is open Wednesday to Sunday 3:30 PM to 2 AM. You can learn more at takuseattle.com.


WE ARE HERE FOR YOU -- SUBSCRIBE TO CHS: Support local journalism dedicated to your neighborhood. SUBSCRIBE HERE TODAY. Join to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL. You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment. Why support CHS? More here.


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ridingsloth
116 days ago
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"He’s also interested in seeing what happens when he introduces the loud Osaka vibe in a place Kyoto-quiet like Seattle."
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Magic Acrylic Makes This Ring Stand Out

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LEDs look great no matter how you use them, but sometimes you want to hide them from direct view. [Charlyn] found a great way to do that, using a special material designed just for the purpose.

[Charlyn] built a ring as a piece of fashion jewelry, hooking up a Gemma M0 microcontroller to a Neopixel Jewel, which packs 7 individual LEDs. The hardware is secreted away inside an enclosure featuring both 3D-printed and lasercut parts.

Rather than openly show off the electronics, it’s all hidden away inside. Instead, a piece of black Chemcast LED acrylic is used, which allows LED light to shine through, while otherwise appearing opaque. Those interested in learning more can check out the product details on the manufacturer site.

It’s a great way to make a subtle costume piece that only reveals its flashier side when you so decide. We’ve seen badges use similar techniques on PCBs to great effect, too. Video after the break.

 

 

 

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ridingsloth
172 days ago
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Well that stuff's neat.
ojiikun
171 days ago
Fun fact: this material can often be salvaged from old LCD panels. Better yet, it can be used with or without the diffuser to get more or less diffusion.
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Capitol Hill ‘neighborhood cafe’ Tallulah’s isn’t closed — but it’s not open, either

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(Image: CHS)

Diners hoping for a Friday night visit found the 19th at Mercer restaurant dark and a paper sign on the door announcing it was closed for the night. Weekend brunch patrons had their reservations canceled. The weekend closure followed other nights of unannounced shuttering. This Monday and Tuesday brought more of the same.

Ownership hasn’t said anything definitive but Capitol Hill restaurant Tallulah’s did not have the best week of business even as the venue marked its sixth year on Capitol Hill’s quieter side along the leafy 19th Ave E.

The restaurant ownership won’t say it is done. But it’s not open, either. Owner Brad Haggen tells CHS the restaurant was closed due to staffing issues. “We lost some key staff and were not able to take care of our guests properly,” Haggen said.

He has not responded to further requests as the restaurant remained shuttered this week.

(Image: Tallulah’s)

The wrinkle comes just over a year since CHS reported on new ownership for the Linda Derschang creation.

Tallulah’s debuted in December 2013 in a lighter vision, veggie-friendly menu, and more modern design design that was partly a response to Derschang’s reputation for vintage and dive vibes.

Entrepreneur and investor Haggen, part of the family behind the grocery chain told CHS after the 2018 acquisition that the Derschang founded restaurant represented a “no brainer” opportunity as was looking for businesses to start or buy following his family’s sale of their interest in the grocery company.

Haggen made Tallulah’s part of a small collection of “neighborhood cafes” including Skylark’s in Bellingham and ownership of regional franchise rights to a Neopolitan pizza chain.

For now, it isn’t clear what Haggen’s next move will be on 19th Ave E.


IT'S NEARLY THE END OF 2019! YOU'VE BEEN MEANING TO! SUBSCRIBE TO KEEP CHS GOING INTO 2020! EXCLAMATION! The holidays are busy times when we typically lose subscribers. We need your help. Support local journalism dedicated to your neighborhood. SUBSCRIBE HERE TODAY. Join to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL. You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment. CHS currently has just over 800 subscribers! That's a lot! But we need more. Why support CHS? More here.


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ridingsloth
202 days ago
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Well, at least Lisa and I got in once?
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Now open: Zaika — new Indian on Pike at the base of Capitol Hill

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Zaika owner Nitin Panchal (Images: CHS)

Not everyone is shying away from big food and drink opportunities on Capitol Hill.

Zaika, a new Indian restaurant taking over the Tango space at the base of Pike just above downtown, is setting out to be, well, new Indian — a new take on the familiar food and drink that blends in with its colorful neighborhood and the bustling nightlife of Pike/Pine.

“There’s something new out there,” owner Nitin Panchal tells CHS. “Most of the people, they might not ever have tried something like this.”


IT'S NEARLY THE END OF 2019! YOU'VE BEEN MEANING TO! SUBSCRIBE TO KEEP CHS GOING INTO 2020! EXCLAMATION! The holidays are busy times when we typically lose subscribers. We need your help. Support local journalism dedicated to your neighborhood. SUBSCRIBE HERE TODAY. Join to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL. You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment. CHS currently has just over 800 subscribers! That's a lot! But we need more. Why support CHS? More here.


With the exit of much loved Poppy from Broadway earlier this year, Zaika is ready to step in and offer forward looking takes on Indian cuisine with a menu that has room for both Malai Chicken and Chicken Tikka Tacos. Beyond the menu, Zaika’s opening took longer than expected as Panchal said he tossed out the initial designs for overhauling the space and spent extra weeks on refining his launch menu. It’s an ambition not far removed from the efforts that drove the creation of Mamnoon as a showcase of Middle Eastern flavors just up the block from Zaika on Melrose.

CHS talked with Panchal this summer about his plans for Zaika and hopes to bring “a Capitol Hill happy hour take on Indian food” to the former Tango space. Tango Restaurant and Lounge closed after 19 years of date nights and tapas at the corner of Pike and Boren to make way for the new venture.

When Tango was born, its area wasn’t quite the draw Zaika inherits. Today, it shares the block with the massive Starbucks Reserve Roastery and the Melrose Market, both huge magnets for neighborhood visitors, shoppers, and diners. Not everything has changed. Though its building sold, Club Z still does its thing across the street.

Panchal, who ran the Chutneys on Queen Anne for a decade — though not its Capitol Hill cousin that closed in 2013 — and also operates Subway franchise locations in the area — didn’t want to add another traditional Indian restaurant to Seattle. For one, it would be a waste of Capitol Hill. “This is where we can do something different,” he said, saying his hope is for his Indian clientele to seek out Zaika as an alternative to more traditional restaurants and for neighborhood diners to embrace the new project as a great place for meals and drinks mixing seasonal Pacific Northwest tastes and ingredients with Indian flavors and spices. Eater Seattle attended a tasting and has more here on Zaika’s offerings including pumpkin soup with coconut cream, goat cheese potli, fish moili, and dahl jeera cauliflower.

There is also lunch. Eschewing the business lunch buffet scene, Zaika instead offers an elegant — and filling — $15 thali that is an excellent showcase of the simple twists it is hoping to bring to the Pike and Melrose dining scene.

Zaika is now open at 1100 Pike. You can learn more at zaikaseattle.com.

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ridingsloth
208 days ago
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Tango replacement is open. Run by the guy who ran Queen Anne's Chutneys (which I love(d?)) and doing Thalis for lunch? I'm very interested.
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